Category Archives: Presenting

How to nail your speech and hook your audience, every time

 

[Guest Post by Ghina Halabi]

I was giving a TEDx talk. My speech was carefully prepared and I had twelve minutes to speak. Three minutes in, I had no idea what the next line was.

Among the audience was the president of the American University of Beirut, some two hundred people and my speaking coach, Dania. It felt like drowning in an ocean. Water was closing in and the sounds were muffled. Only my heartbeats were audible. I pleadingly looked at Dania hoping she’d remember. Reading my eyes, she distressingly mouthed the words “I don’t know”. So I realised that I was entirely on my own.

Then I found my line.

It felt like eternity, but it was merely few seconds. By not panicking, my mind thought it didn’t matter so it remained calm and silently found its way.

Funnily, no one noticed the glitch. They thought I did it for a dramatic effect. “We had our eyes and ears glued on you to hear the next bit”, they said.

So keep calm and act it out like a boss. Chances are no one will even notice.

Speakers often don’t realise that a good speech or talk is not only about information, it’s also about persuasion and influence. When they wheelbarrow information and impersonally click through crowded slides they not only miss precious opportunities to further their careers, but also to position themselves as leaders and thought influencers. Having a presentation with the right structure and content has never been more important for creating impact. So how do you give your audience such a transformative experience?

Here’s everything you need to know to nail your speech and hook your audience, every time.

 

Preparing your talk

First, figure out who your audience is. What you want to say does not matter if your audience are not coming to hear it. Find that sweet spot at the intersection between what you want to say and what your audience is interested in, that’s the relevant content that you should be unravelling. Once you have that figured out, you are ready to design your talk but do not touch that laptop yet!

Take a walk, go for a jog or do some physical activity to get your endorphins flowing. While you’re at it, think about what you want to talk about, flex your story-telling muscle and find your narrative. What is it? Why would one care about it? Sell the why not just the what! The first few moments and slides are your chance to get the attention of your audience, or not. Make it a smooth and easy take-off. Do not rush to the details before you are sure that your audience is coming with you. Engage them from the start, otherwise it’s very hard to hitch them back on again. Start with a story, remember how I started?

Once you have your story or narrative in your head, grab a pen and paper. Outline your story using bullet points. Those bullet points will be the titles of your slides. Line up your slides while sticking to that narrative.

Now we have the outline, it has a smooth and nice build-up. It follows a narrative. Let’s talk content.

 

Content

Images! Have one or two images (or graphs) per slide, strictly not more than that, and a few words if you absolutely need to. No sentences or paragraphs! This is key. Countless are the talks that I sat through with slides brimming to the rim with text and images with an ongoing voice-over that is different from the slide altogether on top of it all! If a crowded slide hits one in the face, one tries to make the decision whether to look and read or just listen, and by the time the decision is made the speaker has already moved on to the next slide. This is a recipe for confusion, frustration, and the audience abandoning your talk and daydreaming instead! Your power is being able to convey a message with an image and few words for emphasis.

If your image is too crowded, layer it to introduce each layer separately. Use animations and effects smartly to serve your idea and presentation rather than to dress it up.

Choose a modern font. Not comic sans, sans blague!

Having well thought-through presentations position you as an expert to be trusted. Thus it’s essential that you know your script, your material and be prepared.

Preparation helps you think of the bigger picture, put things in context and reflect on your assumptions if you had made any. Practicing helps you design your sentences smartly and say the most with the fewest words possible, rather than ramble on and never hit the point. However, prepared does not mean staged. If you practice a lot make sure not to slip into a boring gear and never shift out of it otherwise, I tell you, you’ll find us snoozing.

 

The big day

Feeling like there’s a stone brick at the pit of your stomach on your big day is normal, but that’s only your brain tricking you into a fight-or-flight mode. How do you convince it otherwise?

Here’s a trick my coach Dania taught me that always worked for me: before you’re due to speak, go somewhere private (restrooms work well usually) and pump yourself up. Jump, squat, punch the air. Yes, get it all out. Look at the mirror, smile and tell yourself how great you will be, how hard you worked and how you’ve got it all. Punch the air a bit more.

Now you are in the room where you will speak and you can punch no more. It’s time to calm down, in fact.

Whether it’s waiting through the introduction or for the speaker preceding you to finish, this certainly does not need to be a time to dread. If you are anxious, an extremely efficient exercise is to simply breathe. Take long inhales and exhales to slow down your heartbeat. The more anxious you are the longer your exhales should be. Perhaps try to inhale to the count of four and exhale to the count of five or six. Trust me, I do it every time and I get so relaxed I start to yawn. Just relax and let your confidence build up so that your authenticity shines through. As you take that stage, don’t forget to make eye contact and use your voice to engage your audience so they trust what you say and appreciate the time you’ve put into it.

 

Tips to keep improving

  • Ask for feedback. This helps you see things from a different perspective and improves your presentation skills.
  • Join a Toastmasters club. It’s an excellent venue to practice public speaking and work on your body language and voice projection.
  • Chair meetings if you can. Taking charge and moderating the discussion teaches you to appreciate people’s ears and how to connect with them in a genuine way.
  • Always welcome speaking invitations, especially those you think you are not good enough for! That’s only your imposter syndrome playing you.

One thing I learned from public speaking is that it’s not only what you say that matters, it’s how you make people feel. If you make it your genuine goal to make people connect with what you say, or learn something from you, they’d appreciate you for it so leave good lasting impressions.

My last tip is remember to smile. Smiling while speaking reflects confidence and authenticity. Then it’d be hard to look away!

 

Ghina Halabi is a Space scientist, public speaker, blogger, mentor and published scholar. She is an invited speaker and panelist at several international astronomy conferences, public events and interdisciplinary forums (e.g. Global Scholars Symposium, National Astronomy Meeting, UN Space for Women Expert Meeting). She is the founder of “Scheherazade Speaks Science”, a science communication platform to improve the representation and visibility of female scientists.

This article is based on a talk that Ghina gave at the Women in STEMM Media Training” workshop by the Communications Office at the University of Cambridge.

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7 Habits of Effective Speakers (or How to Get More Invited Talks on Your CV)

I bet you have been there already! Sitting in a crowded, dim-lit room, listening to a somewhat obscure presentation and wondering whether the rest of the audience feels as bored as you! Giving talks at conferences is central to being an academic. Getting invitations to speak as such events is even more critical. Yet, you can’t get the latter if you are not any good at doing the former.

So what makes for a cracking presentation? There are several aspects to it, and intriguing content – though useful – is not enough by itself unless matched by an intriguing delivery. In fact, when it comes to presentations, the how is as important as the what. So, how do you become an effective speaker? Here are seven useful tips to improve your skills.

1. Whom are you talking to? Knowing the makeup of your audience is by far the most important thing to get right. It is your audience who dictates the type of talk you will be giving, the level to pitch it at, and the language you will be using. Mess up with this and (almost) nothing else will come to the rescue. If in doubt, aim low and ramp up the level of complexity only towards the end of your talk for the experts in the room.

2. Face your audience. Once you know who your audience is, speak to them! This means first and foremost: face your audience, not the screen! Make eye contact with individual persons almost as if you are talking to them alone; use body language as if to engage in a conversation. When needed, point to something specific on the screen to draw people’s attention to key points. Oh, and by the way, if you are using a laser pointer, hold it with both hands to avoid a shaking spot all over the screen.

3. Use effective body language. Project confidence by adopting a straight, yet relaxed posture. Lift your head a little and lower your shoulders. Breathe. If space allows, move around a bit. I said a bit, don’t walk up and down in a frenzy or you’ll project anxiety, not confidence. Move towards the audience to create a positive feeling and deliver the key points of your story from the centre and front of the stage.

4. Exploit your voice modulation. Apart from the obvious “speak loud and clear”, modulate your voice to carry emphasis to the key points you are making. Ask questions to engage your audience. Use… silence! Just like in music, it is the pause in between the notes that adds character and drama. So, do not be afraid to make a pause last a little longer. If nothing else, this will re-gain the attention of your audience.

5. If showing slides, use text sparingly. Have you ever noticed that you tend to read anything, whether you are interested or not, as soon as you see it written down? The same happens to your audience. Whatever you’ll show them in writing, they will read. Sadly, they will do so at the expenses of what you say. So, if your presentation contains too much text, your audience will disengage from what you are saying because it will get distracted by what they are reading. Use words in your slides mostly as a prompt to remind you of what you want to say next. Avoid full sentences, unless this is the whole point of a slide.

6. Make presentations that please the eye. Use fonts and sizes that are easy to read and understand. Do not use more that three different colours and make sure that each colour serves a purpose. Also, be aware that sometimes colours render differently when projected on a screen. Make sure sure you use appropriate contrast (no yellow on white background, nor red or blue on dark background). And remember, your colours should emphasise, not distract.

7. Do not overrun. If nothing else, this is a matter of courtesy to your audience, the organisers, and the speakers after you. Stick with the time you have been allocated and do not overrun.  If you realise during your presentation that you are likely to overrun, skip parts of your talk, e.g. extra details that you can defer to the questions session if there is enough interest.

So, how many of the above do you do when presenting a talk? Your favourite tip is not on the list? Then, share it with us in the comments!